Bicycle rear derailleur compatibility - which rear shifters, cassettes and chains can it be combined with

Compatibility [04] Rear derailleurs

Updated: 06/10/2019.

This post explains bicycle rear derailleur compatibility, i.e. what derailleurs can work with which number of rear sprockets (cassettes) and which rear shifters. For explanation of other rear derailleur functioning and limitations, such as chain wrap capacity, read this article: Rear derailleur.


Basic terms and what to pay attention to

Most modern bicycles have index shifters, that work with a certain number of clicks. One click per gear change. That is moving the chain from one sprocket/chainring to another with each click.

In order for this to work, these things need to be in tune:

  • Length of cable that shifter pulls/releases with each click. This is called shifter cable pull.
  • Distance that rear derailleur (RD in the remainder of this text) moves laterally per 1 mm of cable movement. This is called rear shift ratio. E.g. if RD moves for 2 mm for 1 mm cable movement (pull or release), then the rear shift ratio is 2.
  • Rear sprocket spacing.

Not directly related to shifter-derailleur compatibility, but it is also crucial to use proper cables and housing. I wrote a post explaining shifter (and brake) cable and housing standards.

When RD compatibility is mentioned, it is all about it’s tune with the shifter cable pull and rear sprocket spacing. When it is all set up correctly, one click of the indexed shifter shifts exactly and correctly one gear (i.e. one sprocket) at the rear. Compatibility will be explained per number of gears and per manufacturer. If it is not noted otherwise, it is understood that shifter make and number of gears match the RD make and the actual number of rear sprockets. There are three major RD and shifter manufacturer standards:

  1. Shimano
  2. SRAM
  3. Campagnolo
  4. Rotor’s hydraulic derailleurs


1. Shimano

6, 7, 8 and 9 speeds

Rear shift ratio is 1.7, that is for 1 mm of cable pull/release, RD is moved left/right by 1.7 mm. Shimano calls this 2:1 ratio for marketing reasons.

All these RDs are compatible and any 6 to 9 speed RD will work perfectly with either 6, 7, 8 or 9 speed shifter. Regardless whether it’s a MTB, or road shifter, or RD. They are also compatible with Shimano 10 speed road shifters, except the Tiagra 4700 series.

Shimano Dura Ace from 1984 to 1996 period (6 to 8 speeds)

Rear shift ratio is 1.9. They are compatible only with Shimano Dura Ace shifters from the same period (that is for 6, 7 and 8 speeds).

10 speed ROAD RD

Rear shift ratio is 1.7, so it’s compatible with all the 6 to 9 speed shifters, as well as road 10 speed shifters. Same rear shift ratio. MTB 10 (and 11 speed) shifters won’t work well.

Exception is Shimano Tiagra 4700 10 speed road RD – it has the same shift ratio as Shimano road 11 speed RDs, so it will work only with Tiagra 4700 shifters and Shimano 11 speed road shifters.

Another exception is the new “gravel” group (with hydraulic brakes): Shimano GRX. Caple pull wise it’s the same as Tiagra 4700.

10 speed MTB RD

Rear shift ratio of this RD is about 1.2. It is only compatible with Shimano 10 speed MTB shifters and nothing else. Shimano calls this system Dyna-Sys.

11 speed ROAD

Rear shift ratio is around 1.4.  Only compatible with Shimano 11 speed road shifters.

The same shift ratio is used for Tiagra 4700 10 speed groupset, so it’s compatible with it as well, but not with other 10 speed road groupsets.

Rear shift ratio of 1.4 matches old Campagnolo ratio, but I haven’t tested this in practice.

11 speed MTB

Rear shift ratio is around 1.1. Compatible with Shimano MTB 11 speed shifters. Shimano calls this system Dyna-Sys, same as 10 speed MTB, but they’re not compatible!

It has similar rear shift ratio to SRAM 1:1 standard (explained later in this post), so it should match it as well, but I haven’t tried it yet!

11 and 12 speed MTB – Hyperglide+ (XTR M9100)

From summer of 2018 Shimano introduces a new Hyperglide+ 11 and 12 speed MTB standard. It comes with a new XTR M9100 rear derailleur, that only works with a matching shifter (which has an integrated 11, or 12 speed operation switch!) and Hyperglide+ 11 and 12 speed cassettes.


2. SRAM

SRAM has four RD families, with 4 different amounts of RD movement per cable movement (actuation ratios). So the only thing to pay attention to is actuation ratio. As long as the RD matches shifter’s actuation ratio (and vice versa), it will work fine.

First, less popular family of SRAM RDs are the ones compatible with Shimano 2:1 standard. Rear shift ratio of 1.7 means they will work with Shimano (and SRAM 2:1) shifters for 6 to 9 speeds (both road and MTB) and road 10 speed ones, except Tiagra 4700 10 speed road shifters.
RDs made in this standard were marketed as 6, 7, 8 and 9 speed models, though this is determined by the shifter – RD doesn’t care how many rear sprockets there are.

Second, more popular SRAM standard is 1:1, with rear shifter ratio of 1.1. This shift ratio is the same as Shimano MTB 11 speed RD (and shifter), so they should be compatible, but I haven’t tested this yet.
RDs made in this standard were marketed as 7, 8 and 9 speed models.

Third, newer standard is Exact Actuation. Rear shifter ratio is 1.3.
Marketed as 10 speed road and MTB , as well as 11 speed road.

Fourth family is X-Actuation, with 1.12 ratio.
Available as 11 and 12 speed MTB RDs 

EDIT: Based on this comment (on this very article) and provided links to SRAM’s website, Exact Actuation and 1:1 are the same thing. Will have to measure, check and confirm this.


3. Campagnolo

Campagnolo has two standards of rear shift ratio. Old 1.4 and new 1.5. Also, not every shifter pulls the same amount of cable with each click. With 10 speed for example, there is more cable pull for “slower” speeds, than there is for the others.  2.5 mm pull five times (from smallest 1st to the 6th sprocket), 3 mm for 7th and 8th, then 3.5 mm for 9th and 10th. 2.83 mm average cable pull per click.  🙂

Apart from that, as of 2014 (don’t take my word for the exact year), campagnolo introduces another 11 speed standard. Previous Revolution 11 and the newest Revolution 11+. They are not compatible.

Since Campagnolo cassettes sprocket spacing differs from other manufacturers’, it is hard to combine Campagnolo RDs with anything but the appropriate Campagnolo shifters and in most cases cassettes too.

Table of rear shift ratios for various standards:

Shimano standard – 1.7SRAM 2:1 – 1.7Campagnolo old – 1.4
Shimano 10 MTB – 1.2SRAM 1:1 – 1.1Campagnolo new – 1.5
Shimano 11 road – 1.4SRAM Exact Actuation – 1.3Campagnolo Revolution 11+ – N/A
Shimano 11 MTB – 1.1SRAM X-Actuation – 1.12 
Shimano Dura Ace 6 to 8 speeds – 1.9  


4. Rotor

Rotor’s hydraulic rear derailleurs are only compatible with their hydraulic shifters.

Related post – Bicycle rear hub compatibility:

Compatibility of bicycle rear hubs - which can accept what kinds of sprockets (cassettes)
Compatibility of bicycle rear hubs – which can accept what kinds of “sprockets” (cassettes)

Compatibility posts are also available in eBook (printable and Kindle) and paperback editions on Amazon:

Bicycle Drivetrain Compatibility on Amazon
Bicycle Drivetrain Compatibility on Amazon
Share this article...

61 thoughts on “Compatibility [04] Rear derailleurs”

  1. Shimano MTB 11 speed RDs have the same movement ratio as SRAM 1:1 (according to my information).
    Hence, I would expect a Shimano 11 Speed MTB shifter to work with SRAM 1:1 RD on a Shimano 11 speed MTB cassette. Though I haven’t tested this yet.

    However, on a 9 speed cassette, it should not work. Since you’d practically be using an 11 speed shifter with a 9 speed cassette. I.e: derailleur movement ratio should be close enough, but the shifter is “all wrong”.

    Shifer’s cable pull per click should move the derailleur to match the cassette’s pitch (cog spacing).

    So the formula is:
    – Shifter’s cable pull per click – call it P
    – RD’s movement ratio – call it D
    – Cog spacing – call it C

    P*D = C

    Or whichever way you want to mathematically transform it (depending on what’s known). For example:

    D = C / P, or
    P = C / D

    To make things more complicated, most of my info is rounded to one, maximally two decimals – for easier noting which ones are the same. However, when using the rounded up/down figures, the results don’t match exactly. While not even I can now tell (from the calculation alone) whether the mismatch is because a combo is incompatible, or because of the number rounding.

    But it is not all black! 🙂
    I have listed for each standard what it is compatible with. Most of the noted compatible combos have been tested (when that is not the case, I explicitly note it – as is the case with the beginning of this comment).

    Reply
    • woah.. thanks for the elaborate reply and explanation.
      It is all clear to me now. .
      If i have same pull ratio rear shifter and rear derailleur (RD):
      rear shifter count = cog count, with RD capacity >= cog count, thats why my set-up work.

      The SRAM X0 9s shifter + Taiwan 11-46T 9s cog + shimano deore 10s RD with clutch.

      Guess i found a $10 solution for my spare SRAM X0 9s RD and 12-36T 9s cog. I found a Taiwan brand “LTWOO”, that has 9 speed rear shifter model “A5” with 1:1 pull ratio.

Leave a comment

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.